Archive

Posts Tagged ‘premium payments’

Tesco’s 10% pay increase accompanied by cuts and job losses

July 14, 2017 1 comment

The headline figure in the result of the latest Tesco pay negotiations is a pay rise of 10.57% to £8.42, in Tesco’s own words its “biggest ever pay award”. And it is far higher than the pay rises of 2% or less that I received when I used to work for Tesco.

Scott Jones, Usdaw East London C026 branch chair (personal capacity)

But in the detail below the headlines it’s revealed that this rise will take place over the course of the next two years, straight away meaning that the increase is actually just over 5% a year. And this increase comes after small or no increases in the last couple of years.

Another blow will be the decrease in Sunday and bank holiday pay from time and a half to time and a quarter, which in Usdaw’s Network magazine for August is flippantly brushed aside with the justification that most companies already pay a flat rate for bank holiday working. And inflation is currently running at around 3%.

So while a pay increase of 5% is welcome, against a backdrop of cuts in terms and conditions, now and previously, this is merely playing catch-up. And while Usdaw members will have different opinions over the pay deal, the fact that yet again Tesco workers don’t get a vote on it means there is no accountability.

And as one Tesco worker commented to me, with the estimated 1,100 potential job losses at its call centre in Cardiff and possibly more at head office, Tesco is moving money around the company as opposed to making a large investment in this offer. An investment it could afford to do, with a rise in operating profit and a £3.7 billion takeover of cash-and-carry group Booker on the cards.

There is no excuse to close the call centre in Cardiff which will be devastating for those 1,100 workers and the local area. Usdaw and the Welsh government should put as much pressure on Tesco as possible. The union in particular should ballot for strike action over this and future attacks on terms and conditions.

The Mandate trade union in Ireland brought Tesco workers out on strike earlier this year after Tesco tried to change contracts and force workers to take redundancy.

Their strike, which was extended and spread with brilliant picket lines throughout the dispute, was an inspiration to workers here and shows what’s possible. Usdaw should look to this as an example in the fight to save jobs, terms and conditions and to secure a £10 an hour real living wage for all.

Advertisements

Solidarity with Tesco Ireland Valentine’s Day strike

February 8, 2017 Leave a comment
Poster produced by the Activist for use in solidarity selfies with the Tesco workers strike in Ireland

Poster produced by the Activist for use in solidarity selfies with the Tesco workers strike in Ireland

Up to 15 Tesco stores in Ireland will face strike action on Valentine’s Day 14 February after members of the trade union Mandate, which represents more than 10,000 workers at the company, voted 78% in favour of a walkout over contract changes.

Scott Jones, Usdaw East London Retail branch chair (personal capacity)

The changes Tesco Ireland are attempting to force through without agreement affect approximately 250 workers employed before 1996. The new contracts would result in some workers experiencing reduced incomes of up to 15% along with increased ‘flexibility’.

Tesco began their attack on pre-1996 staff more than one year ago when they intimidated and bullied more than 900 workers out of their jobs through a redundancy programme and strike action was narrowly avoided then.

The remaining 250 workers want to stay in the company on the contracts they have but the company is insisting they accept reduced terms and conditions.

This followed moves at Tesco in the UK to drive down terms and conditions last year when hundreds of staff lost out as a result of the pay deal which caused pay cuts in overtime, weekend and night premiums. Meanwhile Tesco CEO Dave Lewis received £4.1 million in his first six months as boss in 2015 and Tesco reported that it had its best sales growth at the end of last year’s quarter for over five years. This profit was further boosted by the Christmas sales meaning that Tesco is on course to deliver a profit of “at least” £1.2 billion for 2016-17.

As one Tesco worker said then: “I’d rather have a living wage than support the lifestyles of shareholders.”

We support Tesco workers in Ireland and their trade union Mandate for taking this action against Tesco’s attempt to implement increasingly low-paid, part-time precarious work in its stores. And we call on Usdaw, the shop workers’ union in Britain, to raise solidarity and discuss industrial action so that the strength of the 160,000 Usdaw members in Tesco is used to fight against low pay and attacks on conditions.

We would encourage all Usdaw reps and other labour movement activists who wish to support the strike to send solidarity messages to the workers via their website (https://tescoworkers.com/contact-us/) and also send copies to usdawactivist@gmail.com. We have produced a poster (see image above) that can be printed out to take ‘solidarity selfies’ and photos with to be shared on social media, tag @MandateTU on Twitter

Activist 61: ADM 2016 Special

April 20, 2016 Leave a comment

Includes articles on premium payments, Usdaw and the EU referendum, Activist guide to ADM and What is the Activist?

Sunday Trading Extension Defeated

March 10, 2016 Leave a comment

Retail workers up and down the country will be celebrating the government’s defeat of its plans to devolve Sunday Trading to local authorities. A majority of 31 voted down the government’s plans including 27 Tory MPs.

Cameron’s reaction to the vote has been to declare that the plans are “dead in the water”, but a number of Tory MP’s have argued that the votes of the SNP, who opposed the changes, should not count given the new English votes for English laws provisions. Scotland already has longer Sunday Trading.

This factor, means that despite the Tories saying they will not reintroduce these proposals, if the government brings in limitations on Scottish MPs to vote on ‘English’ matters and with pressure from big business, may yet appear again. The vote on 9 March was, after all, the third attempt by the Tories to introduce such measures in the last five years.

Clearly the vote is a great result for Usdaw members’ hard work in campaigning and lobbying in opposition to this vote. But given the vast majority of the big, urban local authorities are controlled by Labour, then serious opposition at that level, a refusal to use powers if granted to extend Sunday trading, could have made this ‘dead in the water’ before now.

The task now is to use this victory to give confidence to organise retail workers to halt the attacks on terms and conditions, particularly premium payments that were stepped up in advance of this legislation possibly coming in. Mobilising an active campaign for the TUC demand of a £10 an hour minimum wage, while defending hard won premium payments and campaigning for a minimum of time-and-half for all working on Sundays, must be the goal of Usdaw and other retail unions.

Activist 60: Tesco Pay Deal Special

February 15, 2016 1 comment

Includes articles from retail workers about the Tesco 2016 Pay Deal

Activist 59

January 28, 2016 1 comment

Includes articles on fighting Sunday trading deregulation, Premium Payments, Broad Left Resurgence, Usdaw Backs Young Blairites, Mailbag