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Posts Tagged ‘Sunday Trading’

Activist 65

December 31, 2016 Leave a comment

Includes article on Boxing Day opening, Weetabix strike, Lidl’s ‘living wage’ and M&S premium pay cuts

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Activist 62

Includes articles on Usdaw ADM 2016, BHS crisis, Sunday trading, Retail 2020, Co-op elections amd more

Sunday Trading Extension Defeated

March 10, 2016 Leave a comment

Retail workers up and down the country will be celebrating the government’s defeat of its plans to devolve Sunday Trading to local authorities. A majority of 31 voted down the government’s plans including 27 Tory MPs.

Cameron’s reaction to the vote has been to declare that the plans are “dead in the water”, but a number of Tory MP’s have argued that the votes of the SNP, who opposed the changes, should not count given the new English votes for English laws provisions. Scotland already has longer Sunday Trading.

This factor, means that despite the Tories saying they will not reintroduce these proposals, if the government brings in limitations on Scottish MPs to vote on ‘English’ matters and with pressure from big business, may yet appear again. The vote on 9 March was, after all, the third attempt by the Tories to introduce such measures in the last five years.

Clearly the vote is a great result for Usdaw members’ hard work in campaigning and lobbying in opposition to this vote. But given the vast majority of the big, urban local authorities are controlled by Labour, then serious opposition at that level, a refusal to use powers if granted to extend Sunday trading, could have made this ‘dead in the water’ before now.

The task now is to use this victory to give confidence to organise retail workers to halt the attacks on terms and conditions, particularly premium payments that were stepped up in advance of this legislation possibly coming in. Mobilising an active campaign for the TUC demand of a £10 an hour minimum wage, while defending hard won premium payments and campaigning for a minimum of time-and-half for all working on Sundays, must be the goal of Usdaw and other retail unions.

Activist 59

January 28, 2016 1 comment

Includes articles on fighting Sunday trading deregulation, Premium Payments, Broad Left Resurgence, Usdaw Backs Young Blairites, Mailbag

Vote No to the Morrisons Pay Offer – Demand a Real Living Wage AND Premium Payments!

October 19, 2015 1 comment

Below a Morrisons USDAW rep gives their personal take on the current pay offer which USDAW is recommending. The Activist believes USDAW members in Morrisons should reject the pay offer and demand that the negotiating committee fight to retain premium payments. Given that companies are due to be forced by the government’s new ‘living wage’ to pay £7.20 an hour  to over 25s (rising to £9) it is entirely possible that over the next few years pay could again be restrained like over the past period with the pay rate hovering slightly above the minimum wage once more. This is why the Activist believes that USDAW should actively support and campaign for the TUC’s demand of a minimum wage for all of £10 an hour.

Retail has historically been low paid. So on the surface USDAW negotiating Morrison’s staff a wage increase from the basic rate of £6.83 to the dizzying heights of £8.20 taking them over the so called living wage, seems like a more than fair deal. The company are paying a good wage, the staff are happier, USDAW has negotiated a good deal for its members…

That is about as much coverage if any that you will hear about in mainstream media. The reality is a stark double edged sword. The new wage deal sees the end of the company’s Sunday premium currently paid at time and a half, quite ironic when USDAW ‘The Campaigning Union’ who organise predominately in the retail sector, are fighting the governments propositions to deregulate Sunday Trading, yet are trading away Morrison’s Sunday premium. Are they not in fact preparing for it becoming a normal working day? Or in fact accepting it already is one?

The Sunday premium isn’t where it ends. Overtime, late and early premiums are being scrapped. Forklift drivers and café cooks will see there supplements disappear. People who started with the company after December 2013 will only receive service rewards at 5 year intervals, although people who have worked for the company since before that date won’t be effected and still receive it every year (for people who started work prior to December 2013, they have to work 5 years before they can claim their first service reward). Finally but my no means the smallest in this wage offer, paid breaks will disappear taking the working week down to 36.5 hours (39 hours minus paid breaks).

The concerns of many rank and file USDAW reps within Morrison’s (who don’t negotiate pay, apart from a select committee who sit with the National Officer) is that Terms and Conditions are being traded away for a higher rate of pay, and given this governments appalling attacks on working tax credits and cuts to peoples benefits are the members realistically going to be any better off? Many USDAW members in Morrison’s are part time student workers, some of whom only work a Sunday and its difficult to see how they won’t be impacted financially. Further irony again since USDAW has always proudly informed its members how it campaigned to abolish youth rates in Tesco many years ago.

Of course for some people who don’t work late, early, or Sundays its understandable why they might be excited about the offer. But how long before they are expected to work late, early and on Sundays? Without premiums and with no real right to refuse. What you essentially have or are going to get is a divided workforce. With a natural high turnover of staff, and a general lack of understanding regarding trade unionism and solidarity anyway, retail is difficult to organise in. Now it will be even more difficult for reps to organise and very unlikely to attract non members within Morrison’s.

So what exactly are USDAW doing about all this? Well they recommend the members accept the company’s offer when casting there vote in the pay ballot.

But why? Many members are asking. Surely a trade union fights to strengthen their members terms and conditions? And doesn’t trade them away for the sake of a pay rise? It is not difficult to understand members or even non members apathy towards the union when you look deeply into what is being offered, and a perceived lack of any sort of a challenge from USDAW officials, all they seem to be doing is reminding reps to recruit new members. Perhaps USDAW needs to remind itself that recruitment is only part of organising, and they are unlikely to recruit new members or organise the ones they have if they keep trading away terms and conditions without so much as a fight, Who’s next Tesco? Sainsbury’s? Where’s your next new member coming from? Because you will more than likely hear the old question, what is the Union going to do for me? And with deals like this even the most dedicated reps and trade unionists are struggling to answer that one.

Categories: Updates Tags: , ,

Resist Sunday Trading De-regulation

Amongst the many attacks on workers including in the Tory government’s emergency budget is one that will anger many retail workers, further de-regulation of Sunday trading legislation. At present, shops above 3,000 sq ft can only open for six hours on a Sunday.

There is huge opposition to these proposals amongst retail workers, for many Sundays are the only day they know they’ll have an evening off or a later start, especially given the further ‘flexibility’ of contracts supermarkets are now demanding.

In 2012, when the government temporarily suspended Sunday trading laws for the Olympics, Usdaw surveyed over 20,000 members with 77% declaring their opposition to de-regulation and only 12% supporting it. Moreover, under existing laws which give workers an opt-out from Sunday working, many workers are pressured into doing so.

Chancellor George Osborne and others, point to a £20.3bn boost they predict this would give the economy over the next 20 years, although during the Olympic de-regulation retail sales actually fell 0.4% year-on-year. They also point to opening a level playing field for physical retailers with online shops. Yet many of the major stores affected have online outlets now and the major effect of extending supermarket openings on Sundays, would be the further cannibalisation of smaller & independent retailers.

Osborne proposes to devolve the powers over opening hours to elected mayors and local authorities, is clearly a move to attempt to shield the Tories from blame for this, but it is also can be seen as a step towards regional pay and conditions which the government has wished to promote for some time. Additionally if Sunday becomes a normal working day, there could be attempts to remove what remains of Sunday premium payments.

Given this, it is welcome to see Usdaw General Secretary, John Hannett’s comments that the union “…will vigorously campaign against such a proposal…” However, fine words need to be turned into action. As well as encouraging campaigning in stores and high streets against this proposal, Usdaw must call a national demonstration when legislation is debated in parliament, mobilising members and supporters across the country as part of a campaign to build for strike action if necessary.

Activist 33: Post-ADM Special

Includes a general conference report and one dealing with question of partnership as well as pieces on youth campaigning and the Broad Left.